Browse By

21 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend


‘2019 WHITNEY BIENNIAL’ at the Whitney Museum of American Art (through Sept. 22). Given the political tensions that have sent spasms through the nation over the past two years, you might have expected — hoped — that this year’s biennial would be one big, sharp Occupy-style yawp. It isn’t. Politics are present but, with a few notable exceptions, murmured, coded, stitched into the weave of fastidiously form-conscious, labor-intensive work. As a result, the exhibition, organized by two young Whitney curators, Rujeko Hockley and Jane Panetta, gives the initial impression of being a well-groomed group show rather than a statement of resistance. But once you start looking closely, the impression changes artist by artist, piece by piece — there’s quiet agitation in the air. (Cotter)
212-570-3600, whitney.org

‘JEFF WALL’ at Gagosian (through July 26). Rumination and risk-taking, in equal measure, mark this conceptual photographer’s spellbinding new exhibition. The show, Wall’s first at this Chelsea gallery since ending a 25-year run with the rival dealer Marian Goodman, feels decidedly introspective. Figures alone in contemplative trances, or alienated from their partners in scenes of evident tension, define most of the works. The encyclopedic visual literacy that has long characterized Wall’s pictures (with their compositional echoes of Old Master paintings) has been pared back, allowing more psychological complexity to emerge. Just as new is an emphasis on narrative and sequence; among the pieces are two diptychs and an enveloping, cinematic triptych. (Karen Rosenberg)
212-741-1717, gagosian.com

‘MATTHEW BARNEY: REDOUBT’ at Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven (through June 16). The wildly innovative sculptor and filmmaker, Yale class of 1989, heads back to the halls of ivy to present his first major project since the six-hour excremental eruption of “River of Fundament.” The exhibition shows Barney in a lighter, nimbler mode than he has displayed in years. The new film “Redoubt,” shot in his home state of Idaho, riffs on the myth of Diana and Actaeon; the goddess, here, is an NRA-approved sharpshooter, while the doomed voyeur is the artist himself, making plein-air etchings of Diana and her attendants. Related copper etchings appear in the show, and Barney has electroplated them over varying times, encrusting them with weird metal nodules. “Redoubt” lacks the operatic grandeur some of Barney’s fanboys prefer. But it’s the most emancipated work of his career, and it should make a star of Eleanor Bauer, the dancer and choreographer whom he has entrusted with the film’s most beautiful movement sequences. The film runs about two hours; check the website for screening times. (Farago)
203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu

‘LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN’ at the Museum of Modern Art (through June 15). With George Balanchine, the indefatigable Kirstein (1907-96) founded the School of American Ballet and the New York City Ballet. But he was also an impassioned writer, collector, curator and devotee of photography who had much to do with MoMA in its early years. The museum commemorates his complex career with art, letters and ballet ephemera, drawn from its vast holdings. (Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

‘JOAN MIRÓ: BIRTH OF THE WORLD’ at the Museum of Modern Art (through June 15). Drawn mostly from MoMA’s unrivaled Miró collection, this fabulous exhibition is best when tracing the artist’s brilliant early twists on Modernism and their swift ascent to “The Birth of the World,” a 1927 masterpiece that presaged the drips and stains of radical painting two decades hence. Unappreciated in its time, it was barely exhibited until 1968. (Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

‘THE SELF-PORTRAIT, FROM SCHIELE TO BECKMANN’ at the Neue Galerie (through June 24). Self-portraiture can seem pretty narrow. But the 70-odd works in this exhibition, which run from a handful of delightfully exact Rembrandt etchings to Felix Nussbaum’s searing 1940 painting “Self-Portrait in the Camp,” ably demonstrate the genre’s universal scope: It’s a consciously constructed illusion of spontaneous self-revelation, a sincere put-on. And as such it’s a peek beneath the hood of art in general. (Will Heinrich)
212-994-9493, neuegalerie.org

‘THE WORLD BETWEEN EMPIRES: ART AND IDENTITY IN THE ANCIENT MIDDLE EAST’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through June 23). The Met excels at epic-scale archaeological exhibitions, and this is a prime example. It brings together work made between 100 B.C. and A.D. 250 in what we now know as Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Yemen. In the ancient world, all were in the sphere of two competing superpowers — Rome to the west and Parthia to the east — and though imperial influence was strong, it was far from all-determining. Each of the subject territories selectively grafted it onto local traditions to create distinctive new grass-roots cultural blends. Equally important, the show addresses the fate of art from the past in a politically fraught present. (Cotter)
212-535-7710, metmuseum.org



Source link

Positive SSL
%d bloggers like this: