Life Under Coronavirus Quarantine | The New Yorker


Illustration by Golden CosmosSince its outbreak, the coronavirus has thrown the world into disarray. Peter Hessler describes what it’s like to be quarantined in China, as one of eight hundred million people who have been placed under some kind of restriction. Lawrence Wright discusses his new novel, which may be the year’s most prescient...

Salman Rushdie’s Fantastical American Quest Novel


The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman, talks with Salman Rushdie about “Quichotte,” his apocalyptic quest novel. Like his namesake, Don Quixote, Rushdie’s “silly old fool” of a protagonist, Quichotte, undertakes a journey to win the love of an unattainable woman—in this case, a popular talk-show host. Along the way, he encounters the difficult...

The Effects of China’s One-Child Policy, and a Final Interview with Toni Morrison


The documentarian Nanfu Wang explores the traumatic effects of one of the biggest social experiments in history. The New Yorker airs its last interview with the late writer Toni Morrison. And drones promise to change the way we shop, migrate, and even fight wars, but, for the professional drone racers Jordan Temkin, Zachry Thayer,...